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Memorial created 08-27-2007 by
Toni Craigmyle
Bonnie M. Pierce
July 19 1935 - April 22 2007

Our Heritage

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Our Cherokee Heritage
 

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On my mother's side we are Native American and French (what a whammy), I believe this is where I get my spirituality from. My grandmother often told me as I was growing up that in a tribe I would have been their Shama, because of my insight to my dreams, my nurturing nature and gift of spirit whispering. I never understood my gifts and always strayed away from them. I often told my dreams to her and my mother as they always seemed to understand them. Now I am left alone with them, and confused.
 

Mother was proud of her Heritage


My youngest brother Rick living in Winslow Az. Often sent our mom Indian pictures or turqious jewelry. He knew she loved and was proud of our heritage and collected alot of native american items. She had done alot of research into our families tribe, and where we started from. I just started going through all these papers, and am going to put all the information on a disk for future generations to review.
 

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Cherokee Indian youth's rite of passage Do you know the legend of the Cherokee Indian youth's rite of passage?

His father takes him into the forest, blindfolds him and leaves him alone.

He is required to sit on a stump the whole night and not remove the blindfold until the rays of the morning sun shine through it. He cannot cry out for help to anyone. Once he survives the night, he is a MAN. He cannot tell the other boys of this experience because each lad must come into manhood on his own. The boy is naturally terrified. He can hear all kinds of noises. Wild beasts must surely be all around him. Maybe even some human might do him harm. The wind blew the grass and earth, and shook his stump, but he sat stoically, never removing the blindfold. It would be the only way he could become a man! Finally, after a horrific night, the sun appeared and he removed his blindfold. It was then that he discovered his father sitting on the stump next to him. He had been at watch the entire night, protecting his son from harm. We, too, are never alone. Even when we don't know it, our Heavenly Father is watching over us, sitting on the stump beside us. When trouble comes, all we have to do is reach out to Him.

Moral of the Story: Just because you can't see God, doesn't mean He is not there "For we walk by faith, not by sight." ~ 2 Corinthians 5:7 ~

 

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"When you were born, you cried and the world rejoiced... Live your life so that when you die, the world cries and you rejoice." -- Cherokee Proverb
 

 


 

 

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